Burnout

Image -Pexels.com

Is it possible to get to the end of the school holidays and feel burnt out? Sure we have had a break, had time as a family, visited with friends, played in the surf and had some great chilled out time. But. And this is quite a big but, could it be that really I am exhausted?

Holidays require me, the mother of 5 kidlets to be on duty 24/7, without a break. There is not time out when the little people go to school. No time for that walk alone, coffee in the sun or even visiting the bathroom alone. For the last few months I have been running – on the inside at least. This what I notice happens when I don’t get a break.

  • If you are anything like me you will notice yourself becoming irritable for no reason, anxious and overwhelmed by random, inconsequential things. And then your husband notices this behavior too and that hurts.
  • Taking care of me becomes a distant memory. I work myself into a frenzy of care for everyone else and I fail to make the space and time to do the simple things that keep me sane and recharged. Like exercise, time to journal, meditate and pray, catch up with good friends.
  • Excessive behavior is not one I would have owned up to. But I find myself wasting the time I do not have by self medicating with social media, web surfing for a new handbag or too much TV and this leaves me feeling empty. Some people eat too much, indulge in sugar, alcohol or staying up late. The self -medicating thing looks different for everyone.

So I have arrived at the start of the school year, with plenty of my own work and academic deadlines looming and I am showing  signs of Burnout.  This week needs to be a little bit slow-er. I need to be kind to myself  and make a list of all the things I should not do.

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Dying Days of School Holidays

The dying days of school holidays. I need another coffee mid morning. What are you looking forward to when school is back? Are you anxious, dreading the rush and tumble of school lunches, early mornings and uniforms? Perhaps you are planning fun things for ‘you’ once the kidlets return to school? Love to read your ‘Mummy – back to school list’.

Getting Things Done

I am already feeling a little behind…..and my fun new planner is looking unloved. Why is that? It is hard to plan in the holiday season I find. There is no routine, schedule or commitments.

So how will I get things done? This idea Getting Things Done – GTD from author David Allen really strikes accord. I may have read about it before but today it is screaming at me, READ ME.
Take a look at the quirky and cute video that explains the whole idea in just over 2 minutes.
According to the GTD website the heartbeat of GTD is five simple steps that apply order to chaos and provide you the space and structure to be more creative, strategic, and focused.

Use an in-tray, notepad, digital list, or voice recorder to capture everything that has your attention. Little, big, personal and professional—all your to-do’s, projects, things to handle or finish.
Take everything that you capture and ask: Is it actionable? If no, then trash it, incubate it, or file it as reference. If yes, decide the very next action required. If it will take less than two minutes, do it now. If not, delegate it if you can; or put it on a list to do when you can.
Put action reminders on the right lists. For example, create lists for the appropriate categories—calls to make, errands to run, emails to send, etc.
Look over your lists as often as necessary to trust your choices about what to do next. Do a weekly review to get clear, get current, and get creative.
Use your system to take appropriate actions with confidence.

‘Let me be your shelter, I’ll never leave you alone…’

 

“Brother”

Ramblers in the wilderness we can’t find what we need
Get a little restless from the searching
Get a little worn down in between
Like a bull chasing the matador is the man left to his own schemes
Everybody needs someone beside em’ shining like a lighthouse from the sea

Brother let me be your shelter
I’ll never leave you all alone
I can be the one you call
When you’re low
Brother let me be your fortress
When the night winds are driving on
Be the one to light the way
Bring you home

Face down in the desert now there’s a cage locked around my heart
I found a way to drop the keys where my failures were
Now my hands can’t reach that far
I ain’t made for a rivalry I could never take the world alone
I know that in my weakness I am strong, but
It’s your love that brings me home

Brother let me be your shelter
I’ll never leave you all alone
I can be the one you call
When you’re low
Brother let me be your fortress
When the night winds are driving on
Be the one to light the way
Bring you home

And when you call and need me near
Sayin’ where’d you go?
Brother I’m right here
And on those days when the sky begins to fall
You’re the blood of my blood
We can get through it all

Brother let me be your shelter
I’ll never leave you all alone
I can be the one you call
When you’re feelin’ low
Brother let me be your fortress
When the night winds are driving on
Be the one to light the way
Bring you home

Brother let me be your shelter
I’ll never leave you all alone
I can be the one you call
When you’re low
Brother let me be your fortress
When the night winds are driving on
Be the one to light the way
Bring you home
Be the one to light the way
Bring you home

Growing up Asian in Australia – almost

The Family Law image – news.com.au

I am not who you think I am. I am more than my skin portrays, more than my almond shaped eyes and once upon a time black glossy hair. I am more….

I grew up holding fast to the dated 70s term ‘Eurasian’, as that is who I am and what I am.

No it is not some obscure Eastern European country (a mistake a school mate made). And no it is not some pop band.

My parents were radical in their day. My white Australian mother married a Malaysian born Chinese man. Hence my Eurasian title. I held this title close because half caste, Ching Chong and Susie Wong didn’t quite cut it when I was 8 years old. I struggled with my cultural identity and found the journey of being different in a small, conservative Rural Australian town very hard at times.

We were not as Chinese as some of my cousins and we were not as Aussie as my friends. We ate spaghetti with chopsticks and Mum and Dad made Lap Chong, a dried cured pork sausage that hung in wire boxes in the shed.

In recent years the struggle for me has dissipated. There are bigger fish to fry so to speak. But I am always interested to read about issues of identity and this piece by Giselle Au-Nhien Nguyen sparked my interest and has taken me to Benjamin Law’s new series The Family Law. No I am not a typical Asian gal but many may have made the mistake of thinking I am.

Nowadays it does not matter as much. I know I am more…